August 2, 2013

3,000-year old ancient text of pottery sheds light on biblical history - Aug 1, 2013

In July, JewishPress.com reported on archaeologists finding a 3000 year old, jar fragment written in a seemingly unknown script, it has been called the Ophel Inscription. The Ophel is the archaeology park next to the Temple Mount where the jar segment was uncovered.

The 10th century BC 'Ophel Inscription' was unearthed last year, and scientists were initially baffled by the bizarre language that was inscribed on the remains of a jug.

A few characters on the side of a fragment dating back to the time of King David have stumped archaeologists until now - and a fresh translation may have profound ramifications for our understanding of the Bible.

Experts had suspected the fragmentary inscription was written in the language of the Canaanites, a biblical people who lived in the present-day Israel. Not so, says one expert who claims to have cracked the code: The mysterious language is actually the oldest form of written Hebrew, placing the ancient Israelites in Jerusalem earlier than previously believed.

If the fragmentary inscription could provide evidence of the accuracy of the Old Testament, it would make the Old Testament an historical account of real-life events.

 

4 comments:

  1. It would be very interesting to know what's been translated! Something like this could have a majot profound impact on humanity, could it be manufactured as part of the plan of deception?

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    1. Its on FOX news.
      This tells me that not all is as it appears.
      Buyer beware.

      Delete
  2. i dont belive theres a connection between hebrews and the natives of the region of cannan. Hebrews lead from Abraham father and later from him came from central asia and the modern hebrew are connecting their herritage to the native Phoenicians. they invaved the land and took over their culture and herritage, and when the phoenicians left for other plplaces now they call them the lost tribes.

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